LTE Range Extension Press Release by PSCR- Remixed

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GD-101-logo100Ok so General Dynamics has been plugging away at the PSCR (Public Safety Communications Research for U.S. Department of Commerce)pscrlogorequirements to help standardize (ok commercialize) aspects of LTE for public safety use and they just put out this press release letting us know they have successfully tested a long range (boomer) LTE cell that had a cell edge at 67 miles (108Km.) There’s no detail about the link.

So naturally….

This corporate advo-press release bugs me a great deal primarily because it is in the sweet spot of a major problem with radio communications networking in general but based on the lightness of the announcement the GD team seems to have laid up and skipped the tough problem and just put forth ‘advertising’ level of effort in order tosecure a public safety LTE network deal. So let’s try some different outcomes for the press release and see what could have been.

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1. Alternate Scenario: More power Scotty… Test results presented by PSCR at its recent Stakeholders’ Meeting in San Diego showed that General Dynamics Mission Systems’ high-sensitivity eNodeB, used in combination with vehicle-mounted modems and adaptive link techniques such as beam forming and vertical vectorization successfully served traffic 67 miles (108 kilometers) from simultaneously heavily loaded urban sites, a significant improvement compared to previous trials of the long-range technology.cvg_exp

“Imagine you are a first responder in a rural area with no towers nearby, or a hurricane has hit and there is no working tower within miles, how do you communicate? General Dynamics Mission Systems’ boomer-cell technology extends the effective range of operations providing first responders with the ability to relay and report critical information when infrastructure is not built, has failed, overloaded or when towers are down,” said Bill Weiss, vice president and general manager of Ground Systems for General Dynamics Mission Systems. “It also provides greater flexibility and economic value for public safety system designers when determining tower locations.

OK, I would design the site to have the extra link gain in reserve and expect my SON controller to do this automagically in my existing network. The basic problem with this approach is when you turn up the signal, you are turning up the noise for the neighbors, therefore the no other towers scenario is the ONLY scenario that GD’s test would work out by default. So to make this right, you need more advanced eNB/antenna technology that allows for beam forming.

2. Alternate Scenario: More friends, bigger LTE partyTest results presented by PSCR at its recent Stakeholders’ Meeting in San Diego showed that General Dynamics Mission Systems’ high-sensitivity eNodeB, used in combination with LTE Direct capable vehicle-mounted modems and adaptive link techniques such as beam forming and vertical vectorization successfully served traffic not only 67 miles (108 kilometers) but from simultaneously heavily loaded urban sites, a significant improvement compared to previous trials of the long-range technology, but 500m down a mine shaft, far beyond the reach of any towers.LTEDirect

“Imagine you are a first responder in a rural area with no towers nearby, or a hurricane has hit and there is no working tower within miles, and there are trapped workers in a mine, how do you communicate? General Dynamics Mission Systems’ boomer-cell technology and LTE Direct extends the effective range of operations providing first responders with the ability to relay and report critical information when infrastructure is not built, has failed, overloaded, or when the signal from the towers don’t reach,” said Bill Weiss, vice president and general manager of Ground Systems for General Dynamics Mission Systems. “It also provides greater flexibility and economic value for public safety system designers when determining tower locations.

OK, so in this scenario, we take #1 and add LTE Direct. LTE Direct is a peer to peer technology that would theoretically allow us to relay transmissions between users without any towers. The data can take a path between peers and exit at a tower or WiFi access point. A real game changer for first responders.

 As per the original release, merely adding more amplification to an edge site isn’t new or different. With some larger thinking*, you can solve some REAL world problems without re-inventing the wheel.

Note 1, I had invented a device for scenario #3, but nah, just thought I would demonstrate what can be done with what’s already out there.

 Additional information on LTE Direct:



Original Press Release:

SAN DIEGO, June 5, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Over the past year, a General Dynamics Mission Systems team supported the Public Safety Communications Research Program’s (PSCR) testing of long-range, long-term evolution (LTE) ‘boomer-cell’ technology using General Dynamics’ high-sensitivity Band Class 14 eNodeB, an integral part of the LTE network.

Test results presented by PSCR at its recent Stakeholders’ Meeting in San Diego showed that General Dynamics Mission Systems’ high-sensitivity eNodeB, used in combination with vehicle-mounted modems, successfully operated at ranges up to 67 miles (108 kilometers), which is a significant improvement compared to previous trials of the long-range technology.

“Imagine you are a first responder in a rural area with no towers nearby, or a hurricane has hit and there is no working tower within miles, how do you communicate? General Dynamics Mission Systems’ boomer-cell technology extends the effective range of operations providing first responders with the ability to relay and report critical information when infrastructure is not built, has failed or when towers are down,” said Bill Weiss, vice president and general manager of Ground Systems for General Dynamics Mission Systems. “It also provides greater flexibility and economic value for public safety system designers when determining tower locations.

“We are proud to have supported Phase 2 of PSCR’s boomer-cell testing, which built upon last year’s successful Phase 1 testing to extend the demonstrated range of Band Class 14 LTE. This type of technology is critical to our first responders to ensure they have all the tools they need when they need them,” said Weiss.

PSCR tested long-range operations by mounting General Dynamics’ high-sensitivity eNodeB on a tower at the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, Colorado.

During the test, user equipment operated at two power levels – a standard 23dBm modem and a 31dBm vehicle modem. Testing of the vehicle modems occurred at extended range in the northerly and easterly directions. The test took place during the fourth quarter of 2014 and first quarter of 2015.

Long-range operation is an important technical requirement for FirstNet’s National Public Safety Broadband Network. Long-range operation decreases operations expense and provides more coverage, capacity, and capability for public safety users.

General Dynamics Mission Systems has worked with the PSCR for several years in support of public safety communications technology development and previously completed PSCR’s Phase 1/3 LTE interoperability testing program in 2013. This test was important as it demonstrated technical interoperability of other major vendors’ LTE core, Radio Access Network, and User Equipment technology with that of General Dynamics. More information about General Dynamics Mission Systems’ public safety technology is available at the General Dynamics Public Safety and FirstNet website.

PSCR is a joint program of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Institute for Telecommunications Sciences and the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Communications Technology Laboratory.

General Dynamics (NYSE: GD) combined the resources of Advanced Information Systems and C4 Systems into “General Dynamics Mission Systems” on January 1, 2015. For more information about General Dynamics Mission Systems, please visit gdmissionsystems.com and follow us on Twitter @GDMS.

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SOURCE General Dynamics Mission Systems

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